Sounds cocky but that’s it. Using RestMQ, which builds on twisted, cyclone and a stack of well proven software, you can provide your applications with a robust and flexible queue over http protocol. It already was possible using COMET and GET/POST/DELETE requests, but now with websockets support it got to a new level.

Release gibberish apart there is a cool small app which streams twitter data to a html/css/js based app. Why all that work, would you say, if I can use it directly (well, not that easy because you need to provide username/pass to twitter streaming service) ? Well, for mashing up data and filtering it before delivery. Also, twitter is a convenient source of streaming data for tests, but usually you would roll up your own data source.

An actor based concurrency model or browser-based map/reduce is trivial, just like retrieving data, programming the proper javascript code to do all the work and post i back to a new queue.

Check the repository at http://github.com/gleicon/restmq_websockets and a live demo at http://cowcat.net/restmq_ws/. Note that it needs a websockets capable browser (chrome or a recent webkit build) and it may be down due to my bandwidth constraints 🙂

REST based message queue

November 22, 2009

I’ve been playing with lots of message queues lately, and with each of one, a protocol is favoured. There are modules for all protocols for a given MQ if you look further, but usually only one of them is more developed than others. That’s ok, because it’s hard to find willing people to help in open source projects.

Based on what I saw and used, a simple queue would suffice for most of cases. I tried Amazon SQS and the idea behind it is nice and simple. As I was looking to build a small “cloud-y” infra structure for my projects, I’ve started to build such queue using Google’s AppEngine. This was almost 1 year ago and just last week I found the original code, which immediatly I saw to clean, add API Keys and make it public.

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