RubyConfBR recap

November 1, 2010

Last week I presented at Rubyconf here in Brazil. It was the first edition named Rubyconf, but the folks behind it already had a tradition with Rails Summit. It was a huge event, specially considering that the main focus was a programming language. I got no exact numbers, but people where talking about more than 600 attendants. The site still up and you can see for yourself that there was a lot of interesting people talking.

I was invited by Fabio Akita to speak about non-blocking I/O. It was the first time here in Brazil that I got the opportunity to talk of such topics, and I’m glad that all conferences I attended or presented this year had more technical topics than vendor related and superficial concepts related to methodologies.

I had the opportunity to talk with Jim Weirich and Blaine Cook about what they are doing, and other folks that I happen to see once in a while, even living in Brazil.

Nando Vieira‘s lightning talk was one of the best I saw, along with Blaine Cook talking about webfinger and Emerson Macedo about Node.JS

There goes my slide deck

 

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It’s a big title, but the technology behind a simple collaborative editing textarea can be simple and interesting.

By using a derivative work from pubsub_ws along with diff match patch, it was possible to broadcast patches (yes, the same kind of patches you can create with diff -a) between peers using websockets and javascript.

The most interesting part is that I’m not a js expert, but I built the entire stack only using this language, from frontend to backend. There is also a patch to enable diff match patch to be used from node.js.

Here is the code

Fun with Redis

August 15, 2010

I’ve been using Redis for projects on and off for some time, and there are some little hacks I’ve been doing and never extracted from bigger projects. Yesterday I had to sit home for some time doing a job that involved some idle time waiting, so it was time to hack.

First, I nailed a small RestMQ using Sinatra and Redis. Here’s the gist for the first version, which already works nice along with RestMQ. You can use it to expose a small part of your broker to the outside world. Later, talking with a colleague at work, I changed it a bit and ended up having the whole queue list and hard/soft get (deletes the message or just reads it). Another gist.

Then it was time of extracting Message Queue and Load Balancing patterns from code to my branch of the Redis Cookbook . Apart from the basic algorithm for RestMQ, there is a pattern which I sometimes use to do load balancing and replica spreading. It uses scored sets and although it seems naive, works pretty well along with consistent hashing.

After that I fixed some issues on RestMQ and txredisapi, the first were related to configuration issues and the later related to publish/subscribe.

About Pub/Sub, I ended up extracting a small PubSub server using Websockets, Redis and Node.js. It was initially embedded in another proxy I tried for RestMQ but it works well alone. Check the code. A little bit of code twisting and it can turn into a very flexible actor-based library for node.js. And of course, the PubSub thingy can also use redis as a presence server.

/me deserves pizza

Node.js and COMET

January 31, 2010

Today I started to study node.js, for these last days there was a lot of interesting posts about it.

So to begin understanding it, I setup to port two COMET based examples I did back when I started using twisted to do it.

Note that this may contain javascript misconceptions, as I’m not experienced with it and my js idiom is more geared towards python than proper js.

The first example is a basic comet server which prints a string to each connected user

simple comet

The other example sends the result of twitter searchs to all connected users:

twitter and comet

Node.JS presents a different toolset to solve the current problems we have. It used the excellent libev, among V8 and other cool stuff, and JS is a very modern and flexible language (at least more than I thought about it when trying to do web stuff).

Cheers